Questionable Health

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Background:

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation was formed in 2000, when the Gates Learning Foundation merged with the William H. Gates Foundation.1 Today, it is the wealthiest and largest charitable giving foundation in the world, with over $51 billion in assets.2

As of 2018, the foundation had given away some $50 billion since its inception. In recent years, it has become one of the most powerful voices in the area of global public health. It pours billions of dollars into vaccination programs, HIV/AIDS relief, and other medical and preventative aid. Lately, Bill Gates has become the self-proclaimed expert on the COVID-19 pandemic, and an outspoken critic of the Trump administration's response to it. Most media outlets welcome his voice. One recent Vogue headline read, "Why Isn't Bill Gates Running the Coronavirus Task Force?"3

Reason for Surveillance:

A few voices, however, have begun to object to the foundation's near-monopoly on public health, and they argue that Gates's track record on vaccination programs should give the world pause before it hands over to him the reins of the response to the pandemic.

In the past decade or so, the Gates Foundation has poured most of its efforts into vaccination programs for children in Africa and Asia. But a recent story on the programs highlights the fact that the vaccines the foundation uses have been discontinued in America and most other developed countries.4 In the case of OPV (Oral Polio Vaccine), for example, the story reports that more children have been paralyzed by OPV in recent years than by wild polio.

The foundation also continues to promote the use of outdated and dangerous contraceptives. One of these is Norplant, pulled from the U.S. market in 2002 and now "slightly modified" and sold as Jadelle. It is promoted by the Gates Foundation in alliance with USAID and an organization called EngenderHealth. The latter used to be called the Sterilization League for Human Betterment, and its original mission was to "improve the biological stock of the human race."5

This brings us to the Gates Foundation's real identity: it's a rebranded version of the eugenics programs of the early 20th century. In an interview in 2012, Bill Gates responded to a question on how the world should handle the "problem" of population growth by asserting that "the population growth issue at the global level is not that daunting," but there is a problem insofar as "the population is growing the fastest where people are less able to deal with it . . . Northern Nigeria, Yemen, Chad," and Niger.6

What does the Gates Foundation see as the solution? Cheap, outdated vaccines, and dangerous contraceptives promoted by eugenic organizations. Recent research funded by the foundation demonstrates that such efforts are "working." The study forecasts that by 2100 the global TFR (total fertility rate) will be 1.66 births per woman (replacement level is 2.1).7 The researchers' estimate of population size by 2100 is significantly less than previous estimates, and this change, they say, is largely attributable to fertility decline in contemporary "high-fertility countries," particularly those in sub-Saharan Africa.

The racist eugenics programs of the early 20th century are alive and well, and winning their war against life.

Notes
1. "Melinda Gates," National Women's History Museum: womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/melinda-gates.
2. Jeremy Loffredo and Michelle Greenstein, "Why the Bill Gates global health empire promises more empire and less public health," The Gray Zone (July 8, 2020): https://thegrayzone.com/2020/07/08/bill-gates-global-health-policy.
3. Vogue (April 15, 2020): vogue.com/article/bill-gates-trump-who-coronavirus-task-force.
4. Loffredo and Greenstein, note 2.
5. Loffredo and Greenstein, note 2.
6. "A Conversation with Bill Gates: Population Growth," YouTube (Aug. 21, 2012): youtube.com/watch?v=ozlbeXrb_5A.
7. Stein Emil Vollset et al., "Fertility, mortality, migration, and population scenarios for 195 countries and territories from 2017–2100," The Lancet (July 14, 2020): thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)30677-2/fulltext.

is the managing editor of The Natural Family, the quarterly publication of the International Organization for the Family.

This article originally appeared in Salvo, Issue #54, Fall 2020 Copyright © 2020 Salvo | www.salvomag.com https://salvomag.com/article/salvo54/questionable-health

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