Identifying the Person as the Problem: Euthanasia for Mental Illness

It was a practice that is foreign to most us today: The victim was executed for a crime committed against her. In the case of sexual defilement in which the woman was the victim, the woman was stoned to death in order to keep her uncleanliness out of the tribe. Nike Air Max 2016 Heren blauw

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  • It seems barbaric to our modern-day sensitivities. But, what if a woman wants to be punished for something done to her? What if she sees herself as too defiled to enter into the community? What if she thinks she should be killed? Today victims of child sexual crimes and sexual assault are not put in jail or executed for being dirty. nike tn 2017 femme Kånken Laptop 15 asics gel pulse 6 sklep biegacza The Enlightenment brought with it the idea of autonomy, and with autonomy comes personal responsibility. Solde adidas superstar The just response to sex crimes is to have the perpetrator tried and convicted in a court of law. However, in our modern world, the community’s responsibility toward the victim is a bit hazy. Nike Air Huarache Dealing with the aftermath of sexual crimes, in particular, tends to be private and personal. The Dutch Euthanasia Commission granted a 29-year-old woman permission to die by physician-assisted suicide. nike air max femme pas cher nike air zoom pegasus 32 hombre She suffered from post-traumatic stress from childhood sexual abuse that occurred from age 5 to 15. Among her mental health co-morbidities (because people with PTSD tend to express several types of symptoms), she had what was deemed “untreatable” anorexia due to depression and anxiety. Air Jordan 4 Premium new balance 577 marron homme The Psychological Damage of Sex Crimes In the up-coming issue of Salvo (Issue 37), I wrote the Casualty Report on sex trafficking. Air Jordan 14 Homme In doing the research for this report, one of the key ways that traffickers and pimps maintain control of their victims is by making them feel worthless. Nike Air Max 90 Femme By shaming their victims through abusive and degrading tactics, the victim will not only lose her will to fight back, but she will lose hope for a way out. This is how pimps “train their victims.” Once the cycle of shame has begun, the victim will stay in the abusive relationship because she doesn’t believe she deserves better. Nike Air Max Dames Goedkoop nike air max 1 ultra essential femme

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    The 29-year-old woman was treated as something less than human for most of her childhood. When she was approved for physician-assisted suicide, she was treated as less than human then, too. Eli Manning PTSD Is NOT Incurable In an op-ed for TIME online, Joan Cook, a trauma psychiatrist, says that “No provider anywhere should ever tell a trauma survivor that their condition is incurable.” She points out that treatment can be hard and it can take a long time, but it is not incurable. AIR ZOOM PEGASUS 33

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  • In a Huffington Post article by Jenni Schaefer, author and survivor of sexual abuse, she attests that she was not competent to make a rational and informed decision about physician-assisted suicide while in the throes of her mental illness. new balance 577 damskie The feelings of hopelessness, she says, are part of the illness. In The Netherlands, one of the criteria for approval for physician-assisted suicide is that the patient must be competent to make the decision. How can she be both rational and competent and have an “incurable” mental illness? Jenni’s mentor and PTSD expert, Dr. Tim Brewton, said that it is the obligation of the therapist to instill hope. He says that from a clinical perspective,

    I do not believe in ever giving up on an individual’s potential for recovery. In fact, I think it is the duty of a doctor or therapist to instill hope of improvement, particularly in a young person. Ryan Pickett Jersey Nike Air Max 95

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    Shame consumes a person until the person is completely gone. Odell Beckham Jr Giants Jerseys Welch points out that the deep logic of anorexia, which the woman suffered from, is that the person feels unworthy and deserves nothing, so she gives herself nothing and perhaps she can just disappear (Welch, 28). Stanford Cardinal Jerseys This woman felt unworthy of life and the Dutch Euthanasia Commission agreed with her. Nike Air Max 2009 Femme Autonomy and Compassion Sexual crimes violate the person, not only physically, but also mentally. Nike Air Max 95 Homme air max pas cher It is the ultimate expression of treating another as an inhuman piece of meat, a means to an end. If the victim survives the attack, she is not free; she is in mental bondage. Central Michigan Chippewas Jerseys Her autonomy has been stripped from her. Killing her is not honoring her freedom to choose when and how she will die. nike air max 2017 femme rouge It is honoring the perpetrator’s original intent, which is to consume and discard. Our enlightened and progressive culture has a habit of “solving” the problem by getting rid of the person, whether it is the unborn, the disabled, or the mentally ill. nike air max pas cher The problem of suffering is solved by eliminating the sufferer. nike internationalist homme

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  • New Balance 998 hombre This is sanitized by calling it “compassionate” and justified by invoking autonomy. If Western countries, like The Netherlands, really do value freedom and autonomy, then true freedom means helping the victim out of her mental bondage by showing her the love and dignity that she doesn’t think she deserves. Asics Gel Nimbus 18 Homme Jered Weaver Baseball Jersey Note: After writing this post, I came across this column by Clare Allen in The Guardian, (“The label ‘incurable’ is not a justification for ending a life”).

    Wishing can make it so … or maybe not, if this is about monkeys

    by Denyse O’Leary

    In, "Document Sheds Light on Investigation at Harvard (Chronicle Review, August 19, 2010)," Tom Bartlett reports that Harvard has told evolutionary psychologist Marc D. Hauser to explain issues around a few of his journal articles:

    The experiment tested the ability of rhesus monkeys to recognize sound patterns. Researchers played a series of three tones (in a pattern like A-B-A) over a sound system. After establishing the pattern, they would vary it (for instance, A-B-B) and see whether the monkeys were aware of the change. If a monkey looked at the speaker, this was taken as an indication that a difference was noticed. 

    The method has been used in experiments on primates and human infants. Mr. Hauser has long worked on studies that seemed to show that primates, like rhesus monkeys or cotton-top tamarins, can recognize patterns as well as human infants do. Such pattern recognition is thought to be a component of language acquisition.
     
    Researchers watched videotapes of the experiments and "coded" the results, meaning that they wrote down how the monkeys reacted. As was common practice, two researchers independently coded the results so that their findings could later be compared to eliminate errors or bias.
    According to the document that was provided to The Chronicle, the experiment in question was coded by Mr. Hauser and a research assistant in his laboratory. A second research assistant was asked by Mr. Hauser to analyze the results. When the second research assistant analyzed the first research assistant's codes, he found that the monkeys didn't seem to notice the change in pattern. In fact, they looked at the speaker more often when the pattern was the same. In other words, the experiment was a bust.
    But Mr. Hauser's coding showed something else entirely: He found that the monkeys did notice the change in pattern—and, according to his numbers, the results were statistically significant. If his coding was right, the experiment was a big success.
    Well, the long and short of it is that no one in Hauser’s own lab could replicate his results.

    The research that was the catalyst for the inquiry ended up being tabled, but only after additional problems were found with the data. In a statement to Harvard officials in 2007, the research assistant who instigated what became a revolt among junior members of the lab, outlined his larger concerns: "The most disconcerting part of the whole experience to me was the feeling that Marc was using his position of authority to force us to accept sloppy (at best) science."

    Hauser was found to be solely responsible for the discrepancies, and as of the date of the Chronicle Review article, was on leave.
    The whole story is testimony to the sheer need some have to prove that apes and monkeys are just fuzzy people or we are just naked apes. Life, whatever it is, is not that simple. According to Hauser’s Edge bio,

    MARC D. HAUSER, an evolutionary psychologist and biologist, is Harvard College Professor, Professor of Psychology and Program in Neurosciences, and Director of Primate Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory. He is the author of The Evolution of Communication, Wild Minds: What Animals Think, and Moral Minds: How Nature Designed Our Universal Sense of Right and Wrong.

    [ … ]
     
    Along with Irv Devore, he teaches the Evolution of Human Behavior class, a Core Course at Harvard with 500 undergraduate students. The interdisciplinary course, "Science B29" (nickname: "The Sex Course"), has been running for 30 years, was started by Devore and Robert Trivers, and is the second most popular course on campus, behind "Econ 10". Section teachers over the years comprise a who's who of leading thinkers and include people such as John Tooby and Leda Cosmides, and Sarah B. Hrdy. In 1997-98, he sponsored a trial run of "Edge University" in which the students in Science B29 received Edge mailing as part of required reading in the course.
    Re his book, Wild Minds: What Animals Think, it was what humans think that proved his undoing.
     
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    Darwinian “triggers to persuasion and captivation” read more like the seven deadly sins.

    by Denyse O’Leary From my recent MercatorNet column:

    The Darwinian world of brand marketing

    We all know what evolutionary psychology (EP) has meant for sociology, psychology, and religious anthropology: a serious effort to explain human behaviour in terms of ape behaviour or “hardwired” Stone Age genes. For example, you get your selfish genes from your mother, so it’s her fault if you don’t visit her…

    The EP academics, however pernicious their ideas, are doubtless just trying to understand. But what happens when their theories hit the business world? Fascinate: Your 7 Triggers to Persuasion and Captivation by Sally Hogshead (Harper Business, 2010) gives us a glimpse of the Darwinian universe, as opposed to the Judeo-Christian one.

    Hogshead is a brand marketing specialist. She helps executives persuade us to pay more for a brand than for a reliable service. Her special theory, gathered from research studies of apes and brain scans, is that the best strategy is “fascinating” people, and she has identified seven triggers for the spells a perceptive marketer can cast on them: lust, mystique, alarm, prestige, power, vice, and trust. This list vaguely echoes the seven deadly sins, except for the last. But caution! Here, trust is not an intuition about how the universe really works; it is manipulative. We are told, “trust doesn’t demand a moral absolute—only absolute consistency.” (p 175) Hogshead begins by disposing of free will. (MercatorNet, 30 September 2010) And she’ll end by disposing of your bank account if you don’t look sharp. For example,

    Still more news from the world of privilege:

    Not so long ago, the height of epicurean indulgence was a gold box filled with Godiva chocolates … Then, in an effort to expand, in 1999 Godiva made a fateful decision to distribute in mass retailers such as Barnes & Noble. The chocolates, which for the first time now included preservatives, were no longer a treat to be craved and desired. Now you could buy the gold box in strip malls. (Strip malls!)” (79) Huh? Does this writer really not know that millions of her fellow Americans crave the goods of strip malls in vain?

    Read more here.

    So tell me again, Uncle Doddy: Given the stats, how does sin promote survival – for anyone but the rackets downtown? Denyse O'leary is co-author of The Spiritual Brain.

    Evolutionary psychology: Moral judgement based on “rather primitive emotion”

    In “Psychologists Shed Light On Origins Of Morality” (ScienceDaily Mar. 2, 2009), we read,

    In everyday language, people sometimes say that immoral behaviours “leave a bad taste in your mouth”. But this may be more than a metaphor according to new scientific evidence from the University of Toronto that shows a link between moral disgust and more primitive forms of disgust related to poison and disease.

    “Morality is often pointed to as the pinnacle of human evolution and development,” says lead author Hanah Chapman, a graduate student in the Department of Psychology. “However, disgust is an ancient and rather primitive emotion which played a key evolutionary role in survival. Our research shows the involvement of disgust in morality, suggesting that moral judgment may depend as much on simple emotional processes as on complex thought.”

    [ … ]

    The U of T team found that people make similar facial movements in response to both primitive forms of disgust and moral disgust. Ah, so that proves it then!

    The problem with evolutionary psychology is not just its untethered speculation but its reflexive tendency to define explicitly human activities via non-human, subhuman, or prehuman models.

    Moral disgust is an explicitly intellectual activity. Consider the following situations:

    – a nursing home attendant flushes an old lady’s dinner down the toilet so she doesn’t have to help feed her, and steals from her purse when she is asleep. The old lady is too frightened to say anything.

    – a social worker pressures clients to sleep with him, in which case he will put through the paperwork for benefits (to which they are legally entitled).

    What provokes disgust is the difference between the way things are and the way they ought to be

    So the question is, how do we know what ought to be?

    Also just up at The Mindful Hack:

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